Arts and Crafts Chair 1900s with vintage covers made by Saffron Paffron

Saffron Paffron

I am a textile artist, seamstress, costume maker, singer and street-theatre performer. My sewing work is grounded in my early training as a specialist loose-cover maker. Later, after I retrained as a performer, the ability to work with fabric in three dimensions was applied to my costume making, becoming sculptural and surreal in style and form. My long-standing zeal for recycling and reinventing and my passion for vintage textiles are at the heart of my current textile work. Contact: www.paffronandscott.co.uk.

Ashlee Symington butterfy

Ashlee Symington

I have always loved paper, the clear line achieved when folded, cut or ripped, the textures and the myriad of possibilities a sheet of blank paper holds. I find great satisfaction in creating hand-cut paper scenes, taking inspiration from the incredible beauty of the Norfolk countryside. The focused work of creating very precise, delicate paper cuts is a lovely contrast to the hurly burly of family life! All works are hand cut, one off originals. Commissions taken. Contact: ashleesbirds@gmail.com 07904 600648

 

Lobster plate

Luke Scott

I was brought up in the traditional antiques trade, which gave me a thorough grounding in 18th century furniture, English ceramics and the British country house style. In the last 10 years I have added a liking for 20th century design from Bauhaus to British post war. My taste tends towards a masculine English style, from early oak and Georgian mahogany to Arts & Crafts and industrial design. I especially like country furniture, naïve and folk art and English textiles. To find out more go to www.paffronandscott.co.uk.

Carolyn Brookes-Davies

Ornamental Shellwork. Elaborately ornamented shell encrusted decorative objects. A carefully selected assortment of shells are assembled to decorate caskets, mirror frames, lamps and furniture. With a background in sculpture and love of natural forms, shells with their accidental beauty, subtle colours, textures and endless ornamental possibilities appeal to Carolyn. She graduated from The Royal College of Art in 1982. After a career in London as fashion designer she moved to North Norfolk in 2003.

madeleine spencer

Madeleine Spencer

Madeleine is an artist and jeweller living with her husband and two children on the coast in North Norfolk, UK. After her schooling in wild Wales she went on to study Fine Art in Norfolk, where she works from her studio in the village of Burnham Norton overlooking the marsh. Madeleine has been working as a jeweller for more than ten years. Her training in drawing is visible in the layered marks and textures she applies to the metal, this, combined with the time-worn patinas created through a process of salvaging and re-shaping results in unique pieces of jewellery full of a sense of history and story telling detail. To find out more go to www.madeleinespencerjewellry.com.

Blue beaker with boats

Kate Allsop

Thrown Porcelain & Porcelain Sculptures
Kate Allsop draws into porcelain using a needle and underglaze stains. The simple designs she uses are inspired by her surrounding landscape.

Patrick Kearney (1919 – 1994)

Early North Norfolk Sailing Vessels. A collection of prints from the originals painted between 1955 and 1966, including one of the Bluejacket (pictured on Our History page). Patrick was born and died in Cley and loved East Anglia. His daughters, Frances and Jane, have now brought his work to the public eye once again. To see the rest of the collection and read more about the artist and the vessels click here: www.patrickkearney.co.uk

hand knits for babies

Lindy Kilmaine

Handmade knitwear. Shawls, scarves, booties and baby sweaters made from wools collected from around the world including Alpaca, Merino and even Possum. The patterns have been found on Lindy’s travels to New Zealand, South Africa, Shetland and Quebec and have interesting stories from the people she has met. All the profits from her knitwear go towards needles and wool she uses to teach young offenders in prison near her home.

abbie conway

Abbie Conway

Abbie Conway’s collections are enticing and edgy. she draws inspiration from fashion, interiors and historic jewellery, particularly Ancient Greek – but her inspirations appear withour boundaries.  Conway is fascinated by the way in which we clothe and present ourselves and how this can both alter and affect our moods and perceptions. Her work combines precious metals, silver, 18 carat gold- often forged – precious stones and plexiglass. From the talented simplicity of her Relic pieces, which offer understated style, to the far more daring colourful offerings of the Shard series, it is jewellery for the person you choose to be today. To find out more go to www.abbieconway.co.uk.

Chloe Mandy

Oil paintings, landscapes, portraits, still lives, narrative paintings. Since moving to Norfolk in 1997 she has been painting landscapes. Her work is mostly small in scale as she paints directly in the landscape. Chloe also works in other mediums and has exhibited widely. She graduated from the SUNY College of Fine Art in New York and settled in North Norfolk in 1999. To see more of her work and read her full biography click here: www.chloemandyart.com

Jill Smith Knitting

Jill Smith

The knittings are made from Harris wool bought from local suppliers in the Hebrides off the north western coast of Scotland. The designs feature traditional gansey patterns, mostly from the Scottish fleet. The knittings are made into cushions by Jill’s daughter, Saffron Paffron, exclusively for Bluejacket Workshop. Jill is an artist, writer and life-long knitter who once lived in Norfolk but has now lived for many years on the Isle of Lewis. See her other work at www.jill-smith.co.uk.

Judy Dwyer

Judy Dwyer

Initially inspired by Indian pathway icons, that watch, guard, and have links with another world, my work also draws inspiration from observation of small animals; dogs; cats; birds; rabbits. I wonder where are they going, what are they thinking, are we in their world or are they in ours? Although the creatures have the appearance of soft toys, they are awkward, hampered, restricted, and uncomfortable. Their clothes are stiff, and hard, made of recycled metal or wire, embellished with computer components, contradicting the use of soft luxurious dyed silk and hand embroidery used for their bodies. Things are not quite what they seem. Creatures are human/ animal; male /female; tragic /comic; there is a hint of melodrama, anticipation, pantomime, the Brothers Grimm. Find out more at www.judydwyer.co.uk.